How to Avoid a Pointless Argument

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Reader Comments (20)

ok getting grilled and barbecue wrong is a common mistake

but come on! boiling the hotdogs?!!?

GTFO PLEASE

December 30, 2008 | Unregistered CommenterCrim

Obviously shopped. I can tell by the apostrophes being too far sideways, and I've seen a lot of 'shoppings in my days.

January 10, 2009 | Unregistered CommenterLolursonub

@Lolursonub - Ummm...if that is what you get out of the comic, you probably aren't the target audience for the website.

January 27, 2009 | Unregistered CommenterStinky Pete

Over here in Britain, barbecuing is your grilling - direct heat from below. Our grilling is your broiling.

I was puzzled because of this.

August 3, 2009 | Unregistered CommenterMwezzi

And thats why all Brits are completely fucked in the head...

July 5, 2010 | Unregistered Commenterdrj0n3z

AARGH! That guy makes me so angry!

July 11, 2010 | Unregistered Commenteranon

Actually I like boiling hotdogs, then quick-cooking hte outside on the barbie, nice and crunchy with a tasty center.

Also I like burning childrens dolls.

July 12, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterDoc

I have a way we can all have fun cooking and not worry about what counts as grilling, barbecuing or boiling.

Flamethrowers.

Simple as that...

July 22, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterN

im with N.
finally cooking can be fun. and i would want to "cook" a nearby car

August 2, 2010 | Unregistered Commenterkyle

Amazing how the commentators here seem to have totally missed the message of the original viz.
"How to avaoid a pointless argument". Or is it just that I've missed their irony?

August 11, 2010 | Unregistered Commenterkat

I hate barbequed, grilled, etc. hotdogs. Boiled only

August 28, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterIcalasari

@ drj0n3z

So are your pants.

November 8, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterJay Cee

Gee -- when I think of barbecue I don't think of grilling or open pit -- I think of the way the meat is prepared before it gets cooked -- the dry rub and vinegar marinade or the sauce you soak the meat in. Barbecue takes days to make and can be smoked, grilled, roasted, broiled, or spit fire cooked and still be barbecue (at least, that's what I think), it's all about the flavor in the meat.

March 15, 2011 | Unregistered Commenterqueengeek

As any true Aussie knows, BBQs (not 'barbeques', this is merely a common misconception) involve chucking a sausage/steak/chop or two on the BBQ and leaving it there until it's black and crunchy and you can see the smoke rising from the BBQ. Then you grab it with tongs, put it in a bun on your best paper serviette and smother it in tomato sauce, BBQ sauce and maybe a bit of mustard if you're feeling fancy.

June 16, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterEmily

Checking it up on Wikipedia, it seems the guy on the left is using the US definition of barbecue, while the guy on the right is using the UK definition of barbecue. So they're both right,

(But why am I bothering to post a comment on a comic that's close to four years old?)

September 18, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterBrian-M

@Brian-M
Because now anyone who reads the comments won't have to go to wikipedia to find the truth :)

Although I'm confused..."Over here in Britain, barbecuing is your grilling - direct heat from below." Yes ok, I agree.
"Our grilling is your broiling"
What is broiling? I assume you mean boiling, in which case I'm more confused... boiling is 'stick it in hot water' ...If Americans call something else 'boiling' then that really is just retarded...
I'm British btw in case you hadn't gathered

and @Kat hahaha I hadn't even noticed :P
(Just for the record I'm not argueing I'm clarifying ;) )

January 26, 2012 | Unregistered Commenterabarnybox

I'm from Upstate New York (not The City). Around here BBQ is grilling outside. But I understand that people in the southern states have strong feelings about the meaning of the word.

Broiling is cooking with direct heat from *above*. Which is done underneath the flames in a gas oven, or near the top (directly under the heating element) of an electric oven. You can't broil on grill because you can't put the food under the heat source.

June 11, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterSheherazahde

Try cooking hot dogs by hooking the ends up to an electrical power source and sending a current through the dog - you'll be surprised! In more way than one!

December 29, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterHS

"Barbecue" originally refers to a wooden rack for suspending meat over a fire. That describes a grill about as well as it describes a pit, but I would never have called a grill "a barbecue". In my dialect, "a barbecue" means an event where food is cooked outdoors, normally on a grill.

At this page an image allegedly from a 1583 engraving shows such a rack being used, with no pit. So if you want to insist on going back to the ultimate source of the word, a pit apparently is not necessary.

February 26, 2013 | Unregistered Commenterdsws

"Although I'm confused..."Over here in Britain, barbecuing is your grilling - direct heat from below." Yes ok, I agree.
"Our grilling is your broiling"
What is broiling? I assume you mean boiling, in which case I'm more confused... boiling is 'stick it in hot water' ...If Americans call something else 'boiling' then that really is just retarded...
I'm British btw in case you hadn't gathered"


"Broil" is a word. It means to cook using direct heat, from above or below, such as upon a grill or in an oven.
That said, I don't think the other guy knows what "broil" means.

April 8, 2014 | Unregistered CommenterAtarii

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